« Bills proposing amendments to USERRA | Main | Birmingham News report on suit to undo part of State takeover of city schools »

"Supreme Court's Arizona immigration law ruling could impact Alabama"

The Birmingham Business Journal reported: A U.S. Supreme Court ruling on Arizona's law targeting illegal immigration could have serious implications for Alabama's version of the law that both supporters and opponents say is even tougher than the Arizona's 2010 law.

In a split decision announced Monday, the court struck down most of Arizona's strict law, but upheld a key provision allowing police to question and briefly detain immigrants they believe to be in the country illegally. ...

The 11th Circuit Court, which is hearing challenges to the Alabama law, had delayed its final ruling until after the high court’s decision on the Arizona law.

According to Birmingham civil rights attorney Edward Still, the court could ask for additional briefings from each side to determine whether Alabama’s law is the same or different from Arizona’s.

“Or they could say, ‘Well, the Alabama statute, in this particular case, is verbatim the same as the provisions that were struck down in Arizona; and therefore, we’ll just apply that,’” he said. -- Read the whole article on the Business Journal site.

This entry was posted by Edward at 6:56 PM, 25 June 2012 | Categories: Constitutional law , News Room


The picture above was made in 1914 by the Birmingham Engraving Co. This reproduction is from the Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA.

Information about ...


Contact me
Edward Still Law Firm, LLC
130 Wildwood Parkway
Suite 108 PMB 304
Birmingham AL 35209
tel & fax: 205-320-2882


View Edward Still's profile on LinkedIn

Legal Notices

The Alabama Rules of Professional Responsibility require this statement: "No representation is made that the quality of the legal services to be performed is greater than the quality of legal services performed by other lawyers."

Search


Recently Changed Information on this Page


Entire site copyright (c) 2005-14 Edward Still. See the Creative Commons license below.

Creative Commons License
This weblog is licensed under a Creative Commons License.
Powered by
Movable Type 3.35

Hosted by Hosting Matters






Newsfeeds


Click below to move to a news feed:
Workplace Fairness
Legal News from Jurist
Constitution Newswire